Just Jump In And Do It!

IMG_6936-001.

Happy New Year friends!  Are you the type to make resolutions for the new year?  I don’t exactly make resolutions but I love setting some goals.  And I really love the kinds of goals that have to do with projects!  Because we all know how much I love projects, so setting goals for that is a no-brainer!  (smile!)

 

I’ve had this idea simmering in the back of my mind for way over a year now and it is the idea of holding a summer quilting camp for children.  And if the only thing that came out of the classes would be instilling a knowledge of quilting, then I would be happy.  But if I was also able to spark an interest that would lead to a love of sewing and quilting, I would be ecstatic!  I know that it seems silly that just jumping in and doing it should be so difficult, but teaching children sewing is a really hard thing to do.  What it requires is a whole lot more than just a desire to do it!

.
So… you know where this is leading right?  The biggest project goal I have set for myself for Twenty Seventeen is to plunge in to this dream and hold a children’s summer quilting camp!

 

IMG_7318

My youngest grand-daughter, Rosetta learning to sew.  This machine is great because it can sew at a snails pace and she can use her finger to start and stop instead of the foot pedal. 

.

I’ve decided the best number to start with is four children.  And I already have them hand-picked to be my guinea pigs!  Two of them are my grand-girls (ages 6 and 9) and the other two are daughters of a friend (they are ages 10 and 13).  So I have a broad age range but there are a lot of benefits to these four girls.  Other than my littlest grand-daughter, they all three have their own sewing machines and have a good base of knowledge of sewing.  And they know me and will be very forgiving of my mistakes!  (I will do all the fabric prepping and cutting as I don’t feel any of the girls are ready to use a rotary cutter yet!)

.

We are months away from being able to start so I have plenty of time to plan it out.  And I’m a planner so I’m going to enjoy every step of the journey.  I thought I would share a few things with you today and how I’m getting started on the planning process and this way if there are any pointers that some of you could give me; I’m all ears!

.

517XFT44KQL

.

I want to teach some of the history of quilting along with the actual sewing part.  A book was recommended to me from my local quilt shop called: A People And Their Quilts.  I was able to pick it up at my library and I’ve loved reading it.  It has wonderful stories of quilters in Tennessee from days gone by.  Beautiful, amazing stories.  Some of which I’m so excited to share with the girls as we sew.

 

IMG_7370

.

I sent a text to my friend Luanne, in Nebraska (she’s a quilter!) to ask her opinion on simple, beginner quilt blocks that I can start with the girls.  She responded with the above text!  Basically buy this book!  (Smile!)  But she was a big help as we bantered back and forth about a few different blocks that seem simple.

.

FullSizeRender-010

.

I didn’t buy her suggested book but I do own Farm Girl Vintage and it is a treasure of vintage quilt blocks.   So in looking at all the quilt blocks in this book as well as many others elsewhere I finally chose six blocks that start very beginner and hopefully evolve at a fairly good pace.

.

IMG_7373

.

I intend to use the book in the class with the girls to show them how to read a quilting pattern.  It’s such a well-written and colorful book that it makes it super easy to understand.

.

FullSizeRender-009

.

And to make sure that each block is something the girls can sew, I’ve been making them myself and evaluating the sewing level of each.

.

IMG_6987-001.

.

We will begin with the easiest and each week we will work our way up to the hardest grand finale which is the Pinwheel block! One of my very favorites and actually will be quite tricky for beginners but by week six I don’t think I’ll be calling them beginners anymore!

.

Here are the blocks I chose and my quickly sewn samples:

.

IMG_6973-001

Block Number One: Nine Patch

.

..

IMG_6958-001

Block Number Two:  Kitchen Window

.

.

IMG_6963-001

Block Number Three:  Hay Stack

.

.

IMG_6957-001

Block Number Four:  Nine Patch Window

.

.

IMG_6972-001

Block Number Five:  Shoo Fly

..

.

IMG_6970-001Block Number Six:  Pinwheels 

.

.

I’m still working out all the details and all the many guidelines for the classes.  But at least I have the first step worked out!  I’ll be sure to keep you posted along the way!  (And I’m open to any suggestions too!!!)

.

I hope Twenty-Seventeen is off to a great start for you and I’d love to hear what some of your goals are for the new year!

..

Until our gravel roads cross again… so long.

.

Dori

Leave a comment 64 Comments

  1. Cyndie Gray says:

    Oh my dear friend, if I lied nearby I would request to be your uneducated gopher for this camp!!! Then I could learn with the girls! What a delightful project ❤

  2. Rebecca says:

    What a wonderful idea! I love the selections you’ve chosen. I am not a quilter (I’ve made two small 9-patch quilts), but I am a collector of quilts and love, love, love them all. I’ve rescued a few, too. I bought one of my rescues at a yard sale for $3.00! Can you believe that? The lady who was selling it didn’t seem to appreciate what she had. She even made the comment that her mother had made it, but that she had made LOTS of them, like it was no big deal. So I had to take that quilt home and give it the love it deserves. I think it’s wonderful that you’re teaching these girls a skill they can have for life.

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hi Rebecca,

      Thank you!!

      I love collecting old quilts too. I’ve have several and they have been gifts to me. One thing I wish is that ALL old quilts had a name sewn on the back of them with a date. That is one thing I will teach my little quilters this summer.

      I’m so glad you have that awesome quilt at home and like you said – can give it the love it deserves! People take these things for granted when they had a mother or grandmother that made a lot of them.

      – Dori –

  3. bonnie ellis says:

    You are the perfect person to do the camp! Best wishes. I think your plans are doable! You go farmgirl!

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Oh Bonnie. Thank YOU!!! Your words and encouragement mean a lot to me. Wish you were close enough to help me out!

      – Dori –

  4. Mary Ross says:

    I really do like your blog. I’ve always wanted to live in the country again since I grew up there as a child for 12 years. It’s so nice to have houses so far apart now we live in the city and it’s not the same. You’re fortunate to have such blessings and such talent with your quilting. I feel like we’re friends already I like your bright happy smile thanks for your ideas on goalsetting which I definitely need right now. Thanks again.

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hi Mary,

      Thank you so much for your sweet words.

      And yes isn’t it amazing how we can have “friends” because of something so simple as a blog post.

      Hugs to you my friend,

      – Dori –

  5. marge hofknecht says:

    I will look forward to your posts on this project. I commend you for wanting to share quilting in a summer camp setting. I work with kids teaching origami at a county home school group and so many little things come into play when working with kids. Their attention spans are shorter but can be stretched as their competency increases. And often with origami some of my students will begin, after having completed the original model a couple of times, by following the creative process that’s deep inside them and creating a totally new model. I don’t make resolutions myself but I do set goals. I list these on one or two small sheets of paper and keep them in the current week of my calendar/journal. The hard part is “look at the list, Marge, pick something and work on it!” ‘Self’ talking to me. But it’s the most helpful method that I’ve found for both short-range and long-range goals and, sister, the satisfaction I get when I cross out that finished or accomplished goal — priceless!

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hi Marge,

      I LOVE that you teach Origami. What an awesome thing. I want to learn from you!! My grand-girls are home-schooled and they get a lot of neat things taught to them at their local home-school Co-Op group but I don’t think Origami is one of them.

      Yes I love goals. And I love lists!!! And I love your idea of of keeping them in the current week of your calendar. I think that is an awesome idea.

      – Dori –

      P.S. And I’m with you on the crossing off the list part!!! :-)

  6. michelle reid says:

    What a wonderful idea to instill this in our future…in 2001 I taught hand sewing to some second graders and one acually started a mending business which was wonderful..

    Just a thought…I have had an idea to create quilting circles to gather and create quilts for a cause….once the quilt squares were done by those in the circle..it would be raffled off for a charity..I thought that kits could be made up..those registering a circle would say how many and would be charged a small fee to mail the kit out..a box filled with the squares, directions on theme..some scraps of material.ribbons..embroidery thread..etc..and those coming to the circle would pay to go..that would pay shipping costs and help with putting the quilt together…Quilting for a Cause…Please let me know your thoughts and if anyone would like to take this on please do..it came to me and I think it could be a fun way to help those in need..Blessings…michelle

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hi Michelle,

      That is so awesome about teaching hand sewing. I think it teaches so much beyond just sewing don’t you?

      And what a great idea on the “Quilting for a Cause”. Love that!

      – Dori –

  7. maureen bruner says:

    check out the tutorials on the Missouri Star quilt company’s web site. You’ll be amazed at the way blocks can be simplified. Best of luck with your endeavor, it’s a life long joy to sew and the girls will thank you over and over. Many Blessings

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hi Maureen,

      The tutorials on the Missouri Start Quilt Co website are wonderful. I use them a lot! I will definitely have the girls watch some.

      Thanks for the encouragement!

      – Dori –

  8. Pam says:

    Dori, you are an angel to even think of this wonderful idea. Those girls are very lucky to have you teach them the wonders of sewing and especially creating quilts. I am sure you will have a great time together. Can’t wait to read the progress of your project in the future.

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Awwww…. thank you Pam.

      And yes, we’ll have a great time together and that is the most important thing anyway!

      – Dori –

  9. Diane Van Horn says:

    What a great goal! It is so great to be able to pass on some old timey skills and have some fun at the same time! I used to teach children decorative painting in my studio and I have to say they are the best students, they soak it all up like a sponge. You never know, one of your students might become the next great quilt artist! Wishing you all the best and looking forward to photos!

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hello Diane,

      Yes… passing on a love for quilting is really what this is all about for me. I think it is a dying thing and it makes me sad.

      Thanks for the encouragement!

      – Dori –

  10. denise says:

    I’m sure the girls will love this class. I have a friend who’s friend owns a fabric store and every summer they have quilting camp for girls and the girls love it. and I know one girl will sew on her own now. another lady sent her daughter to a sewing class and she said she thinks she is now going to have to buy a machine for her daughter. so I think the girls in your class will love learning how to quilt! Have fun!

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hi Denise,

      I wish I could a quilting camp for kids that someone else holds… I really need to learn how the professionals do it! :-) I feel like I am just totally winging it. That’s partly why I chose the girls I did! They will be good sports about winging it with me!

      Thanks for your encouragement!

      – Dori –

  11. Joan says:

    You are some kind of SPECIAL!!! I was raised by a Great Aunt, Grandmother and Aunt; I learned how to quilt starting at 5. They all pieced and quilted by hand, I have started piecing some by machine but for some reason some do not go together as they do when by hand. I do so love that you are ‘learn’n’ these girls to quilt, they will always be grateful for having the experience. Love the choices of the blocks, they should go together as a super sampler. I have shared many of the older quilts but still have 1 queen (I made) 8 doubles 5 crib/lap and 2 wall hangings (they are whimsical – Garden girls) lots of fun applique (by hand). Well now I wish I could be a fly on the wall to enjoy all the wonderfulness that will be happening and look forward to you postings. God bless you.

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Oh thank you Joan!

      I would love to piece a quilt by hand. I’ve done a lot of hand quilting and LOVE IT. It is probably my favorite thing to do.

      Oh good, I’m glad you agree with me on the blocks. I was thinking they would make a good little sampler lap quilt.

      I wish you could come help! :-)

      – Dori –

  12. ELAINE says:

    WHAT A GREAT IDEA, GOOD LUCK. I ALSO MOVED TO THE FARM OF MY DREAMS 5 YEARS AGO IN EAST TENNESSEE. THIS IS GOD’S COUNTRY FOR SURE!

  13. Margaret Rohn says:

    Dori, This is like being a 4-H leader. Might I suggest you check out Missouri Star Quilt Co. They have a great selection of Tutorials for beginners. I started quilting just 3 years ago and it really is easy. Just plain geometry. I have sewn all my life and wish I had started machine quilting a long time ago.

    As to cutting out the pieces ahead that is part of the learning how it fits together process too. I believe there are rotary cutters that have safety guards for the older girls or at least use scissors after all that is what our Grandmothers and Great Grandmothers used so it must work as those are great quilts.

    I find “stitch in the ditch” the easiest way to machine quilt also.

    Have fun and take pictures for them to enjoy when they are older.

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hi Margaret!

      Yes very similar to 4-H – I was always a 4-H leader when my kids were growing up.

      I LOVE the Missouri Star Quilt Co. She has amazing tutorials. Thank you for the reminder because it could be that having the girls watch a few of her tutorials would be a great idea.

      Yes I agree on the cutting. I debated that and partly why I decided to skip that step this summer is the time factor. BUT, possibly I could work with each girl individually ahead of time and do some cutting. We will see how it goes.

      We probably will just tie the finished quilts this time. Next quilting project will probably be some hand quilting!

      Thanks for your suggestions!

      – Dori –

  14. Nicola says:

    I look forward to checking in. I’ve had a similar idea for a long time but always am busy with life. So goals are so important.
    For mine I’d like to teach low income moms and girls to sew. Even basic mending, repurposing and alterations.
    I’ve never made a quilt although I’ve been a seamstress over 30 years.
    But this seems a perfect project! I LOVE Keeping the past crafts going in our young!
    I’m teaching my 13 yr old to sew at the moment and she also is working on a little quilt.
    Good luck, although you seem well prepared already so I think it will come together great :)
    Nicola x

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hi Nicola,

      It is so easy to let the days (and years) go by isn’t it? I’ve been dreaming about this for ages.

      And your idea is FABULOUS!!!! I hope you’ll jump in and do it! :-)

      You’ll have to let me know how your 13 yr old does with her quilt (email me a picture: redfeedsack@gmail.com !!!).

      – Dori –

  15. Lana Wolford says:

    Even doing a doll blanket/quilt can be a good kid project

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hi Lana!

      These girls (except for the five year old) have all done doll blankets. I think this is a good next step. A big step maybe! :-)

      – Dori –

  16. Krista says:

    Your goal for 2017 sounds absolutely wonderful. I love the idea of teaching children about such passionate things. I bet you really are going to enjoy teaching them. When I am ready I would love to take a class like yours to learn. All of your block choices appeal to me, especially block two and three. Do you plan to teach them all at the same time? Or will it be private lessons? Will they do all the work with you? Or take the work home and do it? I can’t wait to hear how it goes this summer!

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hi Krista!

      All the work will be done with me and the plan is one full day a week for eight-ten weeks. I will do all the pre-cutting and basically have “kits” for the girls. We will plan to do at least 1 block each week and possibly two if they are moving along and comfortable. Then of course there is sewing the border, putting the quilt together, and then the binding. It will just be a lap quilt size. It could be that I’m taking on more than the girls can handle and if so… we’ll figure it out as we go. They are totally my guniea pigs!!!! :-)

      – Dori –

  17. Gloria Smith says:

    What a wonderful goal! I may steal your idea and use it with our quilt guild. We are making charity quilts this year but next year we might give this a try.
    The picture of you in your sewing area is great. You are beautiful and I love all of your mini quilts. I love reading your posts. You brighten my day!

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hi Gloria!

      Please use my idea… not that it is anything special fro sure!!

      Thank you so much for the sweet compliment. It really made my day!

      – Dori –

  18. Marvene says:

    You go girl!! The girls are blessed to have you! Ms

  19. Deb Bosworth says:

    Dori,
    Just jump in and do it! If anyone can, YOU can! You go farmgirl. Am I too old for quilting summer camp? I wanna come too! 😉 Also, I just love love love the fabrics you choose to work with. They just scream happy! BTW. You are adorable!
    Hugs dear!
    Deb ( Beach Farmgirl )

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hi Deb!

      Thank you for your sweet encouragement! You are NEVER too old for quilting camp!! I wish you could come!!

      Most of my fabric stash is that kind of happiness! :-)

      Hugs back dear friend!!!

      – Dori –

  20. Renee Pontious says:

    Dori: What a special gift you are giving to these girls. Sharing your beautiful talent! Wish we were closer as my soon to be 9 yr. old grand daughter wants to learn to sew. That’s what I plan to do in 2017 is teach her to sew. And, I plan to have more tea parties

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Thank you Renee,

      Wow! I wish we lived close enough to sew together! You’ll do awesome teaching your grand-daughter!

      And yes, I plan to have more tea parties too. Thats an awesome goal!

      Hugs to you!

      – Dori –

  21. Hello! I live in Rio Rancho, NM, but I’ve from TN and have a grandson with 4 daughters living there. I was wondering where you live as she might have 3 of her girls in your class! I think they’d love it as they live where they can do lots of outdoor things and are homeschooled. They live on Center Hill Lake.

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hello Meredith,

      We are a LONG ways from Center Hill Lake. We are near Fayetteville. Too bad as I’d love to meet your grand-daughters! They would probably fit right in with mine!

      – Dori –

  22. paulajean says:

    This is a wonderful project and I am thrilled to see you passing on the art of quilting to the next generation. Have you thought of teaching a class for women? Do you mind if i ask where you live in Tennessee? Our home is in Centerville. Best wishes!

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hi Paula,

      I have thought about teaching a class for women and have actually had a lot of people inquire. Maybe after this summer and I get a little teaching under my belt! :-)

      We live near Fayetteville!

      – Dori –

  23. Cindy says:

    The blocks that you have chosen look good for a beginner. There is also a book by Carol Doak called Your First Quill Book. It goes over lots of basics.

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Cindy,

      Thank you for the book recommendation! I am going to check and see if my library has it! Thank you!

      – Dori –

  24. Reba says:

    Your are giving a gift to these girls that is more than knowledge. It is a part of yourself that you are placing into them! What an awesome goal for this year! My Mama quilted and I feel that I have a part of her! Love your fabrics as I notice each has some red in it…my favorite color! :)

  25. Dori,
    Is your Juki machine an HSL-F600, F300, or 29Z. Awesome idea!!!!! I have to get my granddaughters started on a machine soon. And I like that you can slow a Juki way down.

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Good morning MaryJane!

      I have the Juki HSL-F600. I love it. Another feature it has that makes it so nice for children is that with the push of a button it cuts the thread, so there is actually none of that pulling your fabric and thread out of the machine, cutting it, etc. Between the VERY slow speed (and I do mean slow), the ability to use a button instead of a foot pedal, and the cutting feature, it is a great machine for children to use. And it is also a very sturdy and durable machine. Kind of a workhorse machine.

      I did buy a Janome entry level machine for my grand-daughter Jillian (the eight year old) and it is a great little machine but has no speed control, which is so strange. And not too many choices of stitches. So honestly she has quickly outgrown it. Although she uses it all the time, I know she would like something a little “more”. Next birthday maybe! :-)

      Hugs!

      – Dori –

  26. Denise Ross says:

    Great idea, Dori. I’m looking forward to seeing your progress with it all. I think if you just be yourself, your love for quilting will show through to the girls and they will really enjoy your class. I wish you all the best with it.
    I’m planning in painting more, sewing a little more creatively, I usually just do mending etc, and gardening more. Basically giving myself to permission to do something that brings me joy everyday, so that I can be a joyous person to be around and help others in this way too this year.
    Many blessings to you and Gods blessing in your plans

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hi Denise,

      I hope the girls love it. I do want it to be fun for them.

      I love your goals. I too feel that need to do things that bring me joy everyday. And you’re so right – it really does make us more joyous to be around when we do that. Thank you for that reminder.

      – Dori –

  27. Lisa B. says:

    Hi Dori!

    What a wonderful idea! I am 49 and would love to join your camp! I have very basic sewing skills and would love to take lessons from you! But I live in Texas. My dream is to make a quilt. I love them! That book you are using looks like a really good learning tool. I may purchase it myself and follow along!

    • Dori Troutman says:

      Hi Lisa,

      I would to have your join my camp! :-)

      Please do follow along!!! That would be fun! Hey… that might be a good idea. I could do an online camp! :-)

      – Dori –

  28. Marilyn says:

    What a great goal. I want to learn to sew. I am going to start by reading a few children’s books on sewing. After all I am a beginner and do not know any more than a child learning to sew. I also want to get back to my knitting. I want to learn a language[Latin maybe] or brush up on my High School Italian. We shall see. Thank you for this post. I look forward to seeing the progress of this goal. Your posts are always interesting and entertaining. Wishing you and yours a blessed,healthy and happy 2017.
    Marilyn

  29. Ozie says:

    I think it’s an absolutely great idea because I did not learn to quilt until I was in my fifties and I love it. I wish I had someone like you when I was a little girl to teach me. What you have shown already looks great! Wishing you total success in you endeavor because I know they will all be grateful for the rest of their farm lives.

  30. Gail Summerlin says:

    Last summer I did a Cousins seeing camp for my granddaughters and niece. We made pillow cases, made homemade strawberry jelly, helped in food preparation. We also went swimming and went into the mountains to play in a river. It was an amazing week. The lady day of the week we planned a special lunch which the girls all helped to prepare, set a beautiful table, picked flowers from the garden and made flower arrangements. I made plain aprons for each one and we spent one day with them decorating them with Rick rack, buttons or lace. What I learned from that week is having other helpers there is vital. All my girls hadn’t really sown anything much so we really needed one on one. I used grandmas and their great grandma’s also helped. It would have been much harder if I hadn’t had the help. Good luck on your adventure. I know your students will have a wonderful time. By the way, the girls all said they wanted it to lady 2 weeks this year. Don’t think this grandma is up to that though.

  31. Judy says:

    What a great goal and so exciting to be teaching young ones to quilt. I taught my 12 year old granddaughters to quilt and they did an awesome job. I have that book A People and their Qjuilts. My husband actually bought it for me thinking I would love it when we were in Tennessee last year, and yes I love it :)

  32. Dori – Your class is going to be a huge success and girls are going to have to take a number in the waiting list that will develop!

    Angela

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>